Running against ulcers
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Running against ulcers


A peptic ulcer refers to both stomach ulcers and duodenal ulcers (which occur in the duodenum, the first few inches of the small intestine where it joins the stomach). Duodenal ulcers are about 10 times more common than stomach ulcers. A typical victim of an ulcer is a man aged 45-55 ... A peptic ulcer refers to both stomach ulcers and duodenal ulcers (which occur in the duodenum, the first few inches of the small intestine where it joins the stomach).



Duodenal ulcers are about 10 times more common than stomach ulcers. A typical victim of an ulcer is a man aged 45-55 years, although the disease can also affect children and the elderly, as well as women. According to rough estimates, one in ten sooner or later (throughout his life) develops an ulcer. An ulcer develops when stomach acids eat up the tissues of the stomach and duodenum. This results in an open wound. Hereditary factors can cause a person to have a predisposition to develop ulcers. Ulcers are three times more common in blood relatives with ulcers also you can buy buy aciphex. Emotional stress plays a significant role in the development of ulcers. Hormonal changes caused by emotional distress can trigger the vagus nerve to produce the stomach hormone gastrin.



Once in the bloodstream, gastrin forces the stomach glands to produce excess hydrochloric acid. In the absence of food, the acid begins to digest the mucous membrane of its own body. Stomach ulcers seem to be associated more with laxity of the lining of the stomach than with excess acid secretion. The reverse flow of bile from the duodenum can also contribute to this. So-called "stress" ulcers often develop during severe emotional trauma or after a serious illness or injury. They are progressing rapidly.



But they often heal as quickly as the stress is relieved. Ulcer pain. Most people with ulcers experience a burning, aching pain in the abdomen. The pain is usually felt between the navel and the sternum and occurs between 30 minutes and two hours after eating. Relief comes with the start of the next meal. As a result, ulcer patients can gain significant weight (become overweight), so they eat all day in order to relieve ulcer symptoms that they can interpret as hunger. Other common symptoms of an ulcer include a feeling of indigestion (upset stomach), nausea, a feeling of fullness, bloating (gas). Black, tar-like stools may indicate slow bleeding from the ulcer, which can lead to anemia . Some people with ulcers have no symptoms at all. Most ulcers heal in about six weeks, some heal spontaneously. Treatment usually boils down to taking acid-neutralizing drugs. To neutralize stomach acids, you need to take a sufficient amount of the drug. They should usually be taken one to three hours after meals and also at bedtime.


Major complications include heavy bleeding if the ulcer eats away at a blood vessel. If the ulcer perforates through the wall of the duodenum or stomach, then the contents of the stomach can drain through the opening into the abdominal cavity. This usually requires an urgent operation. Surgical treatment is also necessary in case of difficulties in the digestive tract caused by the tissues of ulcerative scars or inflamed, swollen ulcers. It is possible that an operation is necessary when it turns out that other methods and measures do not give an effect; this is more likely to occur in cases of stomach ulcers than in cases of duodenal ulcers.



An operation called a gastrectomy removes the acid-producing areas of the stomach. Another operation involves removing the part of the vagus nerve that stimulates gastric secretion. For a number of people, both types of operations are performed. By itself, a stomach ulcer is not a precancerous condition. However, the symptoms of stomach cancer and stomach ulcers are very similar, and ulceration often occurs in the case of stomach cancer. A non-healing stomach ulcer increases the suspicion of underlying tissue cancer. Gastroscopy is extremely important to clarify the situation.



A duodenal ulcer rarely raises concerns about possible malignancy. Ulcers often recur. Once the ulcer has healed, antacids and other medications can prevent relapse. Check with your doctors about the duration of treatment. Although there is a certain stereotype of the person susceptible to peptic ulcer disease as a high-powered, productive performer, ulcers are even more likely to affect blue-collar workers who are very upset about their status. On the other hand, some people with ulcers are calm, relaxed, at least outwardly, not at all suitable for the type of person who was predisposed to develop ulcers indicated at the beginning.

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